Chive-pistachio pesto

My chives are loving the weather lately. They are both lanky and bushy. When they’re flourishing, I top everything short of dessert with minced chives.

I’m thinking pesto would be a bright note with the simple pan-seared chicken breasts I was planning for dinner. I had a bouquet of parsley* sitting on the counter, next to a bowl of pistachios. Methinks ’tis time for chive pesto.

*(Y’all know that you can keep a bunch of parsley on your counter, right? Just trim the stems, plunk them in a vase or glass, and they’ll last for a week. And they look darned pretty.)

This pesto is intensely green, with a grassy note from the parsley and mild onion flavor from the chives and scallions. A squeeze of lemon is just enough to bring the herbs into focus.

My Tom hates basil with a devout passion, so it took some work to convince him to try this pesto. He was a convert. I knew he would be; he loves all things onion. Now, Luke loves basil pesto, but has disliked onions his whole life. He too approved of this version.

What we made next with it: potato-prosciutto pizza. Beyond fantastic.

I’m already thinking of all sorts of uses: A spoonful coating some steamed baby red potatoes, a dollop mixed with sour cream or Greek yogurt for a dip, a dab swirled into a bowl of roasted potato soup.

Pistachio-Chive Pesto
makes a generous cup

1/2 cup shelled unsalted pistachios
1 small clove garlic, roughly chopped
1/2 cup roughly chopped chives
1/4 cup roughly chopped scallions (green part only)
1 1/2 cups roughly chopped parsley, packed
1/3 cup olive oil (about)
juice of half a lemon (about 1 tbs.)
salt  to taste
1/4 cup grated parmesan

Put the pistachios and garlic in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add the chives, scallions, and parsley. Drizzle with half the oil. Pulse several times until finely chopped. Add more oil and pulse until the pesto is smooth and a consistency that makes you happy. Season with salt. Stir in the parmesan.

It’ll keep for several days tightly covered in the fridge, or for months in the freezer.

Advertisements

About Rivertree kitchen

I am a freelance editor with a specialty in cookbook editing. I've written two small cookbooks (50 Best Sundaes and 50 Best Cookies) and am currently finishing a collection of my own recipes from soup (Sweet Potato-Pear) to nuts (Spicy Almonds). Despite my immersion in recipes, my favorite way to cook is to see what's in the fridge and wing it. I live with my husband, son and dog in rural Wisconsin. Husband (Tom) and son (Luke) are talented cooks themselves; the dogs (Cleo and Libby) not so much. But they're young yet. All the photographs in this blog are my own creations. I'm a neophyte in the world of food photography (as if you couldn't tell), but I still claim blushing ownership of the pix you see here. If you want to reprint them (I can't imagine why), please give credit, if for no other reason than to pass on the blame.
This entry was posted in appetizers and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Chive-pistachio pesto

  1. Trout Caviar says:

    Hi Nancy: I’ve got dough rising for pizza tonight, and you’ve just reminded me of that leftover cress-ramp pesto (cresto!) in the fridge. Thank you very much. I think a potato-cresto pizza will do very nicely. Any luck locating ramps in your area yet? I dug my first of the season, quite small still, on Saturday.

    All best, and hope that thumb heals quickly, and doesn’t require surgery (the things we go through for our dogs….)~ Brett

  2. Mmm, cress-ramp pesto sounds fantastic. I checked again a few days ago; still no ramps. I need to expand my search territory, I think. And no surgery, thank goodness–just the brace for a total of 5 to 8 weeks.

  3. Trout Caviar says:

    Nancy, if you haven’t seen ramps yet, they’re probably not growing in that area, so yes, look elsewhere. My Barron County patch emerges pretty late, and the ramps are well up there. Good news on the hand! Best~ Brett

  4. Pingback: Cracked potatoes: fun with food | Rivertree kitchen

  5. Pingback: Spinach, prosciutto and olive pizza | Rivertree kitchen

  6. I have not checked in here for a while because I thought it was getting boring, but
    the last several posts are great quality so I guess I’ll add
    you back to my daily bloglist. You deserve it friend :
    )

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s